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Time to speak out: Modi's attempt to silence online criticism

WhatsApp and Twitter have been unable to comply with the new laws, which erode the right to free speech

Time to speak out: Modi's attempt to silence online criticism

WhatsApp and Twitter have been unable to comply with the new laws, which erode the right to free speech

Time to speak out: Modi's attempt to silence online criticism

WhatsApp and Twitter have been unable to comply with the new laws, which erode the right to free speech

Time to speak out: Modi's attempt to silence online criticism

WhatsApp and Twitter have been unable to comply with the new laws, which erode the right to free speech

Whatsapp is taking the Indian government to court.

This week, Whatsapp filed a case with the High Court in Delhi, demanding that it declare India’s new social media laws unconstitutional.

These laws – particularly those that enable the authorities to trace the origin of chats – mean that the company will be unable to protect the privacy of its users. India is Whatsapp’s largest market, and more than 400 million Indians have downloaded the app.

A spokesperson for WhatsApp said that the rules "would break end-to-end encryption and fundamentally undermine people's right to privacy". They also warned that it was impossible to trace the origins of a message with 100% certainty, and to implement the necessary security. Any system for tracing messages would be vulnerable to abuse.

What’s more, they added, the social media law would be a crushing blow to free speech. They emphasised that they could not support a law that meant “eroding privacy for everyone, violating human rights, and putting innocent people at risk.”

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