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How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here's what you need to know and which state strategies are working

Getting vaccinated often means pre-registering, then registering, then arranging an appointment and standing in line. Mario Tama/Getty Images

How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here's what you need to know and which state strategies are working

Getting vaccinated often means pre-registering, then registering, then arranging an appointment and standing in line. Mario Tama/Getty Images

How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here's what you need to know and which state strategies are working

Getting vaccinated often means pre-registering, then registering, then arranging an appointment and standing in line. Mario Tama/Getty Images

How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here's what you need to know and which state strategies are working

Getting vaccinated often means pre-registering, then registering, then arranging an appointment and standing in line. Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Biden administration has promised to help alleviate some of the underlying problems, particularly vaccine shortages in some areas and inconsistent deliveries that have upended appointment scheduling.

For many people, trying to get the COVID-19 vaccine has been a lesson in frustration. The vaccine supply is limited in many areas, creating confusion over who can get a first and sometimes second dose of vaccine. Even when given the green light because of their age or occupation, many Americans have no idea how to go about getting vaccinated.

Nationwide, 6 in 10 older adults reported in a recent survey that they didn’t have enough information to know when or where they could get the vaccine. Those that do locate appointment systems are often finding them hard to use, and some have faced cancellations.

The Biden administration has promised to help alleviate some of the underlying problems, particularly vaccine shortages in some areas and inconsistent deliveries that have upended appointment scheduling. But the federal government doesn’t control the vaccination process within states or communication about it, and many states have pushed those decisions to understaffed counties. Currently, fewer than two-thirds of all vaccine doses distributed to the states have been administered, suggesting the problems go beyond supply shortages.

Some states are doing better than others, and they can offer lessons for the rest. And another Biden administration proposal could also soon connect more people with the vaccine and improve communication: activating more pharmacies to help.

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