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Articles

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Can vaccinated people still spread the coronavirus?

You can still get infected after you’ve been vaccinated. But your chances of getting seriously ill are almost zero.

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The coronavirus vaccine: A doctor answers 5 questions

Many people who are vaccinated to be followed long term to ensure no safety complications arise and to ensure that the vaccine remains as effective as originally thought.

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Intellectual property and COVID-19 medicines: why a WTO waiver may not be enough

The race to make vaccines and other useful technologies more accessible to people around the world, has once again highlighted the tension between intellectual property rights and the promotion of public health.

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Coronavirus vaccine: what's getting in the way of the global rollout? – The Conversation Weekly podcast

While some of the world’s richest countries are racing ahead with large-scale programmes to vaccinate their populations, for much of the developing world, the first doses of the vaccines remain a long way off.

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No internet, no vaccine: How lack of internet access has limited vaccine availability for racial and ethnic minorities

Access to the internet, having an internet-enabled device and understanding how to use both have been necessary to sign up for the vaccine.

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How can I get the COVID-19 vaccine? Here's what you need to know and which state strategies are working

The Biden administration has promised to help alleviate some of the underlying problems, particularly vaccine shortages in some areas and inconsistent deliveries that have upended appointment scheduling.

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Why it takes 2 shots to make mRNA vaccines do their antibody-creating best – and what the data shows on delaying the booster dose

Two doses, separated by three to four weeks, is the tried-and-true approach to generate an effective immune response through vaccination, not just for COVID but for hepatitis A and B and other diseases as well.

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Why the next major hurdle to ending the pandemic will be about persuading people to get vaccinated

Maria Saravia, a worker at the University of Southern California’s Keck Hospital, adjusts her mother’s mask before her COVID-19 vaccination.

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How many people need to get a COVID-19 vaccine in order to stop the coronavirus?

It is hard to say with certainty how many people need to be vaccinated in order to end this pandemic. But even so, the arrival of COVID-19 vaccines has been the best news in 2020.

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The cold supply chain can't reach everywhere – that's a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

Getting vaccines to rural and hard-to-reach areas is critical for public health and ethical reasons

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Should Australians be worried about waiting for a COVID vaccine when the UK has just approved Pfizer's?

The news that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine has gained emergency approval in the United Kingdom and may be distributed to selected high-risk groups as early as next week is welcome.

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Why should I trust the coronavirus vaccine when it was developed so fast? A doctor answers that and other reader questions

How can anyone say with any confidence there will be no long-term consequences with vaccines that have been developed so rapidly?

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